The Basics of Videojournalism

Haven't updated this in a while, but the book co-author Larry Nance and I have been sweating over is getting closer to publication. The Basics of Videojournalism is two chapters closer to completion. Law and ethics are done and we are moving into our final chapters...mostly dealing with post (organizing, writing, editing, exporting).

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Business…

Heads up - this is a "shameless self-promotion" posting. My visual storytelling business is up and running. While small (with intentions to stay that way), I have plans to make it big - in quality. Although I've dabbled a bit with video production and its many challenges, I find my love of news and storytelling … Continue reading Business…

Whither to aim…

1. Point and shoot cameras. Flip type cameras with no zoom or a very short distance zoom (or worse yet, optical zoom) and no microphone input. 2. Consumer level camcorders with one smallish chip, a decent zoom and no microphone input. 3. Prosumer/low end professional level camcorders with three chips and either XLR or mini-jack mike inputs. 4. DSLRs.

...high?  Low?  In between?

Like I used to tell my students, you gotta know your target audience before you even think about creating a visual story.  Well, the same thing applies to writing a book.  In this case, The Basics of Videojournalism.

Our original demographic was high schools...then we realized there was a wider potential audience, so we have adapted to that.  And we've also finally settled on some of the finer points about our audience, including what level of gear they need.

Roughly we've broken gear into four basic groups.

 

Part One: a theory of storytelling…

What makes a story memorable? Is it the plot; the setting; the characters; use of imagery and figurative language? Although these are standards in written stories, there are additional elements in visual storytelling that must be taken into account. Stories originally were told orally – through words and gestures by common folk and master storytellers. … Continue reading Part One: a theory of storytelling…